A Statement of Outrage By Delinda McCann

 

 When we, Americans, talk of government officials we often call them leaders.  We speak of the leaders in industry and leaders in banking.  They are leaders, but in what directions are they leading our nation?  How have they cherished and protected the country our forefathers have passed into their keeping?  Where does our patriotic duty to respect our leaders end and the need speak out in outrage against the corruption of elected officials and the abandonment of just laws begin?

Do We The People have the right to live in a capitalistic economic system based on free markets?  Our big corporations, banks and Wall Street say no.  We have left capitalism behind for corporatism where the biggest corporations control the majority of the markets for food, household goods, energy, money and investments.  Is there a safe place where those who want to save for their retirement can place their money with the expectation of a return that will keep them ahead of inflation?  It appears that the banks and investment markets are so controlled by a few moneyed interests that the small investor is simply food for those who manipulate markets.  Is our government supposed to protect free markets by limiting monopolies, thuggish behavior and hostile business practices?  Is it the role of the government to protect the population from manipulative investment practices?  Big banks and Wall Street say no by buying influence to eliminate the regulations that once prevented monopolies, predatory lending, gambling by banks, and speculation in the stock market.  Why isn’t the current mode of operations called corruption?  Does loyalty to our country demand loyalty to a few big industries or should we speak out in outrage?

Do We The People have a right to be truthfully informed through our media?  Should we be loyal to the corporations who control most of our media?  Is that loyalty to our government?  What happened to ethical investigative journalism?  Recently I saw a documentary about the press in which our president made a speech.  The three major news channels showed about two minutes of the speech before they cut in with their news hosts commenting on what they thought the president would say, what he ought to say, and their understanding of what he was saying.  The public was not allowed to hear the speech on a major network.  Is that a free press?  Does corporate controlled media inform or does it manipulate through biased reporting?  Does this behavior demand our loyalty or should we speak out in outrage?

 Do We The People have a right to a safe, healthy food supply?  The Monsanto Company says no and they will fight tooth, nail and pocketbook to protect their right to feed unsuspecting people chemicals and altered food that may cause cancer, digestive problems, asthma, autism, obesity, and dementia.  For many years, Americans did have a safe and healthy food supply.  Many assume that this is true today.  Food safety has been eroded away to the point that agri-business together with Monsanto controls the regulatory processes that once protected our food supply.  They now propose regulations that target those with healthy farming practices to make selling their farm products challenging to impossible.  The latest such proposal is to declare that only chickens raised indoors are healthy.  This is the most insane example of backward thinking I can imagine.  Yet this is the backward direction our food industry is traveling.  Does loyalty to our country demand that we accept living with food related illness or should we speak out in outrage?

Do We The People have the right to access to safe drinking water?  Oh surely people in the United States have access to safe drinking water.  Neither of my daughters can drink the water that comes out of the tap in their homes because the water is contaminated.  One daughter lives in downtown Pasadena CA and the other lives on Vashon Island—neither of these communities is considered poor, yet they live with outdated water systems that nobody wants to keep up to date.  Many older communities face this problem.  Still, some areas face a greater problem.  Our governments don’t seem to be funding or issuing permits for updating aging water systems, yet officials choose to issue permits for fracking despite growing evidence that the chemicals and gasses used in the fracking industry do enter our water supply.  The solution we are given for compromised water systems is to add more chemicals to the water to try to make it cleaner.  It seems that nobody is minding the store when it comes to providing safe clean water to drink.  Is it time to speak out in outrage yet?

While I am loyal to the country my ancestors built, I consider loyalty to a government that is subservient to a very few special interests with money enough to bribe officials to be a betrayal of the country in which I grew up.  It is time for us as citizens to set aside petty differences and speak out in outrage at being betrayed by the system our ancestors built to protect us.

If you would like to know more about Delinda McCann visit her web site at:   http://delindalmccann.weebly.com/index.html

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36 thoughts on “A Statement of Outrage By Delinda McCann

  1. Sharla

    Delinda, powerful and oh-so necessary words for a nation shifting shamelessly upon the foundation laid by our forefathers. Thank you for putting into the written word what so many truly feel but hold back for whatever reason(s). It is hoped more will read in agreement and share with others who will share with even more until the outrage finally erupts in a manner conducive once again to the nation’s pledge and constitution.

    Reply
  2. DLKeur

    You go, girl. Right on! But, you know, I don’t know HOW ‘We the People’ stop the Supreme Court, the Congress, and the Presidency from bowing to Big Money. I really don’t. Armed rebellion, guaranteed by our Constitution, is out of the question. They’ve got the military and WILL use it. Voting in new people doesn’t work. As soon as they get elected, they get bent to Big Money’s will, either through threats or greased palms.

    Reply
  3. James L. Secor

    Far too polite. But the most heinous act of the US was buying the Nobel Peace Prize for a man who has a perverse love of mayhem, murder, assassination and the proliferation of drones–even over his country.

    Reply
    1. Martha Love

      James, I sure hope this comment section doesn’t digress into a “who done it” as we could all point fingers and name names on both sides of the aisle, the middle, past and present. Yet that is not the point, I do not think, of Delinda’s piece as what she seems to be pointing to is our own need to get involved and not let the corporate machine take over our lives . I think getting involved on the local level is our best answer to standing up on this issue and making a difference. This is so well written, Delinda, and I hope many many people will read it and stand up and be counted!

      Reply
  4. James L. Secor

    I had a comment written but this trashy damn near impossible to read captcha blew it all away. I suppose it’s part of the paranoia of the country, foisted upon us by our leaders and protectors. It is a means by which to limit knowledge or the spread of such.
    You are too polite. But the most heinous behavior was the buying of the Nobel Peace Prize for a man perversely in love with war, mayhem and murder–assassination and drone-spreading. Drones even here in US skies.

    Reply
  5. Delinda

    Writer Micki Peluso couldn’t get past the Captcha code so she sent her comments directly to me. I think they are worth passing on.

    Delinda, since they put up the new capcha, it won’t take my comments-not on our or any site. I fill it in right and I get an ‘errorcapchs’ or’ wrong capcha’.So here’s my comment for your outstanding post. I felt your outrage stram off the page.

    Well said, Delinda. Sadly, we have become a nation of complacent people who complain about the incompetent, coniving and downright illegal behavior by our leaders by both parties. We are already a socialized country. One of our forefathers said something to the effect that the it’s better for the people to do the majority of the governing. “We the people’, deserve, in part, exactly what we have, because instead of nipping corruption in the bud, we all complained. Prices of gas went up–we griped but paid it anyway, instead of cutting back on usage enough to hurt the companies and oil barons of the Middle East. The government allowed and told the banks to do what they’re done which sent people into foreclosure. Yet, except for a few Americans who work hard and try to stop this once great nation from total destruction on all levels, the collective ‘We’ do nothing but complain. As a journalist for twenty-five years, I wrote a commentary columns on the loss of freedom. Freedom, fought so hard for by our forefathers is fragile. When even one tiny part of freedom is taken away, all freedom begins to crumble to nothing but a pile of ideals and dreams. I actually stopped writing my editorials, due to the fact that the ears of Big Brother are hearing and reading everything we write or say. I fear for my family if I express my views too strongly–is this America? Either we stand together–if it’s not too late or we will be forced to live in a government that tells us what we can eat, drink, and and how we must act. We can be and should be angry-but at ourselves because we saw it coming, slithering like the serpent of the legendary Garden of Eden–and didn’t bother to stomp it down while we could.
    By Micki Peluso

    Reply
  6. andy parker

    Delinda,

    It would be convenient to believe that all of the single minded politicking, income disparity, and daily outrages are the result of some sort of creeping malaise but I think think that this behavior is as as old as dirt. We just now see it more clearly. Things were at times easy in this country many years ago when there was so much land that the government gave it away to average people because the rich couldn’t use any more of it. In World War Two all of that natural wealth and immigrant work ethic allowed the United States and others to defeat Fascism and the result was that we ramped up to be the far and away the largest economy in the world which we still are. Twice the size of China which is number two. Life was good in the USA. It is even said that life was better in the 50s, 60s and 70s than today. While the gap between the rich and the poor was smaller then, I lived through those times and believe me by every measure the average citizen was much less comfortable than today.
    Now the country and the rest of the world is filling up with people. More people with the same land and resources means those resources are more expensive. Part of the answer is to create more affordable resources to feed and house this increasing population utilizing newfound technology and pooled financial capital to pay for the precesses. In the US this has developed into an enormous, complicated, economic machine which is inextricably linked to our form of government. It was developed out of market need with only minor regard for individual human concerns. Attempts to control these machines in other countries with a “decider” on a large scale, such as Soviet style communism have proven disastrous. We in the US rather fortunately inherited a system descendant from a merchant society where the deciders are the market group. In our modern case a very large group. So large and complicated that we need a list and a rating system to arrive at what issues to decide. The way issues requiring decisions get placed on the list out of all of the millions of issues is whether it has enough “power” to command the attention of the decision makers over other competing issues. The power to command attention is practically expressed as money. What rating system would people in a democracy trust better than a market? Unfortunately for fairness sake, those individuals with a lot of money have an inordinate amount of power. The ability to pay for campaign contributions, lobbying, advertising, and salesmanship are the tools to access the deciders. Hopefully asa deciders, we Americans, have the awareness to scrutinize what issues come before us and make wise decisions regardless of the power behind them. Thanks to an open internet (always under threat) and the blogosphere such as this site we nowadays have an unprecedented view of the world as compared with the past when we trusted commercial media to funnel everything through a 3 tv channels and two newspapers . With all of the world now under glass we see the dirt in a way we never have in the past, which is very disturbing. Sadly, outrageous behavior sometimes trumps money for our attention. The good news is that we are the deciders. We can propose issues and see them thru to policy. But it may take some money, maybe a lot of money and salesmanship to get the attention of the other deciders. And who knows, we deciders can even decide that money will be less important than it is in decisions we make. Why don’t we?

    Your distant cousin, Andy

    Reply
    1. Delinda

      Andy thanks for bringing another element into the discussion. We often forget about the effects of populations increases on our resources. I agree that we see more dirt than we did in the past. I think part of our challenge is to get past the business as usual dirt and focus on meeting the real needs of our growing population.

      Reply
      1. andy parker

        I guess what I am trying illustrate to guide the national agenda to meet humanistic need is the responsibility of every person at the smallest scale. Nominate trustworthy politicians. Propose statewide initiatives. Lobby sitting politicians for your cause. It is naive and dangerous to think of the government as “them”. The Republican party likes to trade on this fear of the government as “them” to rally the seemingly disaffected. Don’t listen to it. If there is a problem with the system it is that we do not monitor the behavior of the servants of the people closely enough. A politician by his nature and really necessity must convince to a broad and diverse enough audience to get elected. There is an incentive for him or her to speak to the individual agendas and then change directions reacting to the more powerful forces on him when nobody is looking. Stake out your issues and bond with those of like minds, and stay tuned in. Expose duplicity and obfuscation, Fire the politicians if they come up short.

        Reply
  7. Monica Brinkman

    Finely written piece whose time has come. I salute you.
    When government allows money to rule it is time, we the people, stand together for it is the only way things will change. As long as the media, advertisers, political leaders and corporations are able to create fear and hostility among ‘we the people’, this mockery of what our government and country has become, will continue. For it is the care of our future as a country and generations to come that should matter, not fear of persecution that should rule all our minds. This is a cross roads and all of us have choice – to continue on the same path of destruction or bond together for effective change. Our forefathers fought diligently for our freedom yet we seem to cower and accept injustice. I do not blame anyone but ourselves for we do ‘reap what we sow’. If we sow the love of luxury, materiel objects, and complicity, then this is what we shall receive.

    Reply
  8. Bill Hiatt

    Very eloquent, Delinda! I could easily use this in one of my English classes as an example of how to support arguments effectively.

    Reply
  9. Rosemary "Mamie" Adkins

    Delinda, you are right on with the exception of adding Pharmaceutical Companies to this list. I have long since felt that they have ever intention to keep our nations sick with diseases that cripple, mane or destroy lives because the dollar dictates what cures get discovered. Take Diabetes for example, there is not likely to be a cure-billions of dollars would be lost in just the health care and diabetic supplies. Cancer is gaining some stride but both diseases and so many others should have already been well on the way for resolve.

    But will our government ever allow this kind of money to disappear for the few holding it? Not a chance. I love my country but it seems the leaders are NOT listening and completely motivated by the dollar. Take away some of the frivolous spending and we could see cures.

    Give some of the countries that we destroy and then rebuild a “fishing pole” sort of speak and help them learn to stand on their own-stop this rescue everyone when we need rescuing ourselves.

    Yes, your article has allowed us to share our anger and speak out. Great job!

    Reply
  10. Delinda

    This comment was sent to me from a wise woman, Jocie DeVries. She couldn’t figure out how to leave a message but wanted to express her thoughts.
    *******
    This is my response if you can figure out how to post it under my name.

    Outrage is an interesting concept, Delinda. It brings back an old memory – once after I had spoken out in outrage at a public hearing about the damage a woman causes her unborn baby if she drinks alcohol during pregnancy – I ran out of the hearing and down the stairs in tears. By nature I am a shy, reserved person and I was embarrassed at the emotion I had expended in front of other people. As I ran down the stairs like Cinderella tearfully fleeing the castle; an old black gentleman stopped me and said, “It is quite alright to express righteous indignation.” I felt stunned but comforted. Expressing outrage is a hard thing to do if you are typically a calm, self contained person without an agenda. Sometimes as a believer I will haunt myself by saying, “oh that wasn’t a Christian thing to say.” But according to the Bible, occasionally expressing outrage is exactly the thing to do. In Ecclesiastes 3:1-8 it says, “There is a time to love and a time to hate. There is a time to speak and a time to refrain from speaking.” So as I allow myself to reflect on scripture and let it sink in and guide my responses to life – I feel joy, comfort and peace. I’ve – accepted the things I can not change. Changed the things I could and in spite of the troubles you so eloquently described, I am discovering the wisdom to know the difference between expressing myself in an irrational, profane rage and expressing righteous indignation. Thanks. I needed this reminder.

    Reply
  11. Harmlessjoyce (Joyce Elferdink)

    Delinda, you pointed out the most compelling concerns, causes, and conditions for change. We MUST become risk takers, willing to say no to corporate influencers who don’t care about the living conditions of the majority or the future of even their own family members. Working within communities of caring people makes it easier to take risks while sending a more powerful message than one told by a few–even when those few are the super rich.

    Could we become that courageous community? (I’m in…)

    .

    Reply
  12. Delinda

    Here is another comment sent directly to me.
    I tried to respond to your article, but could not see how or where. I don’t do any of those little figures.

    But Right On! Concerning big government and monopolistic mega-companies with government servants in their pockets. There have always been problems in our government, but real statesmen (few were women!) could come together and work out solutions to serious issues. This didn’t always please everyone…..but grid-lock was not the order of the day. Until we get the pacs under control and really limit campaign contributions we will have toadies sitting in congress and the senate owing their jobs to Mr. Big Bucks.

    As for the purity of our water supply, I think the bottled water business has done a number on the American Public.

    Alta

    Reply
  13. Bryan Murphy

    You’ve certainly sparked a lively debate, Delinda. If it is any consolation, the situation is not much better in the rest of the world, if at all. The power of banks and other transnational corporations seems to be burgeoning whilst that of national governments declines. Even supposedly communist China is learning corporations’ power to corrupt. On the other hand, there has been a significant backlash in places like Turkey, Spain and Brazil. One thing that governments could still do would be to fund and equip the regulators well enough to do their job, and scrutinise them closely to make sure they do it properly.

    Reply
  14. David J. Starr

    My personal outrage is reserved for unemployment. You want to hurt someone? Take their job away. Losing your job is as bad as losing a loved one. You want to make a guy feel bad about himself? Tell him the company doesn’t need him any more. Then watch him have to tell his wife there will be no more paychecks. Want to do the people some good? Create good jobs. One good job beats all the social programs in the world.
    Our government has been working hard for twenty years to throw people out of work. There was Sarbanes Oxley, that makes it difficult to impossible to create a new company. There was Great Depression 2.0, caused by government meddling in the mortgage markets. There was Dodd-Frank to make the world safe for huge companies. There was Obamacare to suppress hiring and encourage part time employment. There is the Patent Office which makes every new product subject to law suits by patent trolls. There is EPA with regulations against nearly everything. There is the ethanol mandate to raise the price of gasoline. There is FDA to add a couple of years and a few $ billion to development of each new drug. And then there is the Federal Income Tax and the IRS to bury us in paperwork while taking our money. There is the Endangered Species Act to slow or stop development nationwide and shut down guitar makers. There are “renewable” energy mandates to raise the price of electricity.
    With all that malicious government activity, it is a miracle that we still have 1.8% GNP growth.

    Reply
    1. Delinda

      Thanks for bringing up the topic of jobs. We seem to be at a checkmate on the jobs front. In addition to those jobs that went overseas there seems to be little incentive for existing companies to jump through the hoops to expand. Neither the government nor industry are going to help us.

      The solution may need to come from many people starting small businesses requiring little cash investment. I’d like to see development of community energy generation or even significant home energy production. Being energy independent would be a huge boost to startups. I think we can have a thriving hemp paper and fabric industry if we could lift the ban on hemp. Then we wouldn’t need to buy paper and fabric from other countries.

      Reply
  15. Delinda

    I am posting this comment from Marta

    Dear Delinda,

    I’m e-mailing my comment to you at Ken’s suggestion because I cannot get through the new catcha. I don’t think it wise to express an opinion about another country’s politics and policies, yet your article set me wondering. Besides its pristine clarity and elegant style, it poses the same problems we are undergoing in a Third World country. From the end of the map -literally so; Argentina is the southernmost country in Latin America- we look up to the U.S. as an ideal system to be envied. My son would say that it is the consequence of watching too much television :)
    However, either things have taken a bad turn for the worse since I used to visit regularly or I, under the shelter of the academic world I frequented, was totally blind to the problems you describe.
    One way or the other, while there are people like you, ready to take the bull by the horns and question the powers that be, America will remain unsurpassed, as ultimately a country is not its administration or its corporations but its people.

    Reply
  16. lynn

    Right on Delinda! Money has become the “god” of our society. There is so much that is so wrong. Besides the examples you have expressed so well, another big one is the alcohol industry. The cost that alcohol causes, to our society, our communities, to our families and to individuals is astronomical and yet, the industry is not held accountable, they and the government rake in billions from the sale of this poison, while we, as a society pay the price of the damage it causes. Alcohol is the leading cause of domestic violence, accidents of all kinds, trouble with the law and health issues PLUS the damage to unborn babies cause by prenatal exposure to alcohol resulting in permanent brain damage and life long problems. The statistics are well documented. 60 to 80 percent of those in our jails have Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder. Imagine, without alcohol, our prisons would be 60 to 80 percent empty. Imagine the savings to our justice system. Beside the cost of incarceration, there would be savings in court costs, enforcement costs, etc., as well as safer communities. Add to this the emotional, physical and social consequences and the impact is huge! But, the alcohol industry has our government in its back pocket. As you have expressed Delinda, how can we, in good conscious be loyal to a government who values money, not people.

    Reply
  17. Mary Clark

    Free market economies are long since a thing of the past. Even at the time of the American Revolution this was in jeopardy. Free enterprise meant making a living by your own work, not needing to make a greater profit each year, but simply enough to support one’s family and perhaps a few employees. In the late 1800s our economy became the industrial-military complex Eisenhower so aptly named years later. One of the founders, Abraham Clark, foresaw this threat. He worried that we were becoming a consumer society and would end up in debt to the rich. So capitalism today is not a free market system. Whether it ever could be is the question. It may be that it is, as with all human systems and groups, inherently corruptible by human greed and the desire for power. That said, our leaders are only reflections of our apathy or involvement. Vilifying them is a way of avoiding responsibility. We are the ones who have to ensure that Monsanto is curbed and our water and air are clean.

    Reply
  18. Clint Evans

    Delinda

    Your post brings to light some ugly truths…This could be Al Gore’s next installment of Inconvenient Truth though I doubt he could get funding for this movie. The way this whole corrupt temple works is by remaining in the shadows. If the majority of people made themselves aware with 2 or 3 basic internet searches the “powers that be” would have major blowback on their hands.

    Media control is one of the big fears of our founders. They saw it as maybe the biggest threat to continued freedom. The irony is the internet has opened things up so much there’s too much info out there. People now have the question “Who do I believe?”

    Depending on the government to care for us and provide us good info was never the plan. The founders set it up so we would be vigilant in questioning the government in healthy debate, demanding accountability to get to the truth.

    You bring up excellent questions that lead to lots of unsettling questions we must ask ourselves. Are we going to let our country’s degradation continue on our watch? Are we going to stick our heads in the sand like so many mindless ostriches?

    Maybe the heart of this whole discussion

    “Are the inmates running the Asylum?”

    Reply
    1. Delinda

      Clint, researching to find the truth is such a huge problem. Part of my research came through having a stroke and three cancers. This is not a recommended method of finding out the truth about health insurance companies. It was bad to the point of being life threatening.
      On other topics I read and read and read. I’ve found that I need to go back and read various pieces of legislation for myself because most media will not give us an accurate synopsis of anything. I’m not certain anybody is running the asylum. It looks like they are grabbing the money and running.

      Reply
      1. Clint Evans

        There was a fraud case out in California. A government worker was taking home like $750,000 in retirement because he’d “held and done” like 7 different jobs concurrently during his working years. How 1 person can do 7 different 40 hour per week jobs at the same time is beyond me.

        The community was a small community of around 60,000 people or so and was bankrupt. This looting of public coffers is happening in many places.

        There’s a general lack of accountability at all levels of western society and like you said “grabbing the money and running”. Let me get mine and tomorrow’s collapse/consequences be damned.

        Reply
  19. Linda hales

    Not being American, I am unfamiliar with the internal workings of American government or its agencies at any level and so cannot comment authoritatively. I will however, thank the many commenters on this thread for opening my eyes to the fact that many Americans, such as yourselves, have made the effort to educate and inform yourselves to a dizzying extent. I am thoroughly impressed with your knowledge. I would be remiss if I did not acknowledge an extremely well written and thought out essay by Delinda McCann and her truthful and provocative approach to putting it all out there for discussion. Well done Delinda!

    Reply
  20. Micki Peluso

    Well said, Delinda. Sadly, we have become a nation of complacent people who complain about the incompetent, coniving and downright illegal behavior by our leaders by both parties. We are already a socialized country. One of our forefathers said something to the effect that the it’s better for the people to do the majority of the governing. “We the people’, deserve, in part, exactly what we have, because instead of nipping corruption in the bud, we all complained. Prices of gas went up–we griped but paid it anyway, instead of cutting back on usage enough to hurt the companies and oil barons of the Middle East. The government allowed and told the banks to do what they’re done which sent people into foreclosure. Yet, except for a few Americans who work hard and try to stop this once great nation from total destruction on all levels, the collective ‘We’ do nothing but complain. As a journalist for twenty-five years, I wrote a commentary column on the loss of freedom. Freedom, fought so hard for by our forefathers is fragile. When even one tiny part of freedom is taken away, all freedom begins to crumble to nothing but a pile of ideals and dreams. I actually stopped writing my editorials, due to the fact that the ears of Big Brother are hearing and reading everything we write or say. I fear for my family if I express my views too strongly–is this America? Either we stand together–if it’s not too late or we will be forced to live in a government that tells us what we can eat, drink, and and how we must act. We can be and should be angry-but at ourselves because we saw it coming, slithering like the serpent of the legendary Garden of Eden–and didn’t bother to stomp it down while we could.

    Reply

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